Running Gear – Running Tips – Why You Need to Know Your Foot Strike When Selecting a Running Shoe

In running the single point of contact with the ground beneath you (unless you decide to crawl part of the way) is your shoes. It is amazing how incredibly our feet are designed to enable us to run – and not only run, but run long distances. However, as most of running nowadays is on hard road surfaces we need to protect our feet and joints from the impact of running. As such it is vital that we invest in a decent and appropriate pair of running shoes. So here is some important advice and tips to follow.

By Nicola Blewett and Craig Blewett

In running the single point of contact with the ground beneath you (unless you decide to crawl part of the way) is your shoes.

It is amazing how incredibly our feet are designed to enable us to run – and not only run, but run long distances. However, as most of running nowadays is on hard road surfaces we need to protect our feet and joints from the impact of running. As such it is vital that we invest in a decent and appropriate pair of running shoes. So here is some important advice and tips to follow.

Know your feet!

Yeah, this might seem crazy but you need to get to know your feet. You may think that they have been attached to you for years and you know them, but let’s reintroduce you to them. When your foot hits the ground, while you are running, it rolls from heel to toe, in order to absorb the impact. So your heal strikes first, then the outside edge hits the floor, then your foot begins to roll in toward it’s inside edge and your big toe. Imagine that – all that happens without you even being aware of it. And this is great as it helps cushion you from the impact, while also absorbing the energy, to prepare for you to launch forward again. This is an amazing design, as the force your feet are absorbing when you run can be as high as 8 times your body-weight! Think of all the fancy systems a car needs to absorb the bumps and jolts of the road – yet your foot manages all this and efficiently transfers the energy back to you through your foot, ankle, knee and hips.

However, because of various factors such as genetics, posture, weight, habits we don’t all have exactly the same foot strike. As a result there are 3 categories of foot strike – the technical term is pronation.

Neutral Pronation – Here the roll of the foot is from the outside of the heel through to the ball of your foot evenly across the front. Less than 30% of runners are in this category.

Over Pronation – Is when there is too much roll from the outside edge of your foot to the inside edge of your foot. In other words your foot has rolled over too much by the time you are ready to take off for the next step.

Under Pronation (Supination) – There is not enough roll of your foot so the outside of your foot takes most of the shock instead of finishing in the neutral position.

Wow, this sounds all so scary. Well, it’s not really, but it is important to understand what type of foot strike you have to minimize injuries. You may be wondering how you got through your life so far without knowing this. Yeah, good question. But, the fact is as soon as you are considering running more than 30 minutes a week, that is a continual pounding on your body and it then that you will realize the importance of correct shoes.

Running easy experts and marathon and ultra marathon runners, Craig and Nicky Blewett, are the creators of the “Running Easy” approach and website. Get their FREE SPECIAL RUNNING EASY Starter Pack “Running Easy the Ultimate Secret for Optimum Health, Fitness, Successful Weight loss and Feeling Good!” at http://www.Runningeasy.com
I Can Run A Marathon is a free semimonthly ezine and social network running site for runners using the “running easy” approach.
You’ll get insider secrets and free running tips for completing your 1st 5 mile, half and full marathon with a smile, guaranteed!
Subscribe at http://www.icanrunamarathon.com You are welcome to ‘reprint’, this article online, provided it remains complete (including the contact information at the end) Thanks!

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How to Eat & Drink During a Marathon


Marathon Training & Running Tips : How to Eat & Drink During a Marathon

Here’s a short video on how to and what to eat and drink during a marathon.


Marathon Training & Running Tips : How to Eat & Drink During a Marathon

Here’s a short video on how to and what to eat and drink during a marathon..

Running 101 with Coach Rio

Running 101 with Coach Rio
Empowering People thru Faith and Fitness

LEARN
The Right Form, Right Stride, Right Prep, Right Goal, Right Gear…

Event Date: Saturday, July 17, 2010, 1-4pm
Location: Room 402 CCF, St Francis Square

To register, go to http://www.totalathletenetwork.org/registration

Running 101 with Coach Rio
Empowering People thru Faith and Fitness

LEARN
The Right Form, Right Stride, Right Prep, Right Goal, Right Gear…

Event Date: Saturday, July 17, 2010, 1-4pm
Location: Room 402 CCF, St Francis Square

To register, go to http://www.totalathletenetwork.org/registration.

Marathon Training – Running Tips and Top Ten Secrets to Start Running and Train For a Marathon!

This article shares the insider secrets and tips how as a first timer, training for my 1st marathon helped me Feel Good, Lose Weight and achieve optimum health and fitness. Running using the running easy approach has given me a zest for life and an enthusiasm to embrace a healthy lifestyle. I started as an absolute beginner with no previous running experience and went from completing my very first marathon to completing multiple marathons and ultra marathons using the running easy approach. The endorphin lift running gives you is simply poetry in motion. No need to head for any “feel good” pills.

By Nicola Blewett

I’d love to share my secret with you! My husband convinced me to run a marathon and I’ve never looked back. Running has given me a zest for life and an enthusiasm to embrace a healthy lifestyle. The endorphin lift running gives you is simply poetry in motion. No need to head for any “feel good” pills.
I have just last month successfully completed my third Comrades marathon a 56 mile(89km) marathon. Yes its more than double the distance of a standard marathon and known as “the ultimate human race” but I entered the stadium smiling, feeling on top of the world!
Coming from someone who was never an athlete at school and only picked up jogging as a hobby and never considered myself jogging anything further than 3 miles tops, this is quite an achievement well within everyones reach. Most humans go through life not realizing how powerful their minds and bodies are once you decide to actually use them for what they are designed to do!

Here are the top 10 tips why Running is good for you, allows you to enjoy multiple benfits and why as a first timer its worth running and following a Marathon schedule so you can successfully complete and train for a half or full marathon

1.Running controls your metabolism, so even when you do enjoy snacking on the odd takeaway or sweet delicacies, it simply becomes fuel for your body to burn when you head out for a run.
2. Running hugely increases your Brain Power and boosts your energy levels allowing you to live life to the full!
3. Running allows you to enjoy the exhilaration of fresh air, beauty of nature, new smells, new scenery and new seasons.
4. Enjoy awesome sunrises and sunsets as you head out for an early morning or late evening run.
5. Feel all your worries for the day simply melt away as you head out for a run.
6. Running boosts your immune system and a fitter, healthier body helps keep all the nasty infectious germs we are in contact with daily at bay
7. Running helps you say no to that extra slice of chocolate cake or serving of pudding as you start feeling good about the new, fitter and slimmer you
8. Watch inches fall off and your body start toning into shape as you train for your first marathon or half marathon.
9.Enjoy the comments from your friends when they tell you, you do look years younger!
10.The exhilaration of completing your very 1st marathon makes the achievement of all goals seem within reach, as you realize what amazing things are possible when you put your mind to it!

Why train for a marathon or half marathon, why not simply start exercising?
Human beings sadly don’t keep goals without a program or schedule. When you set a goal to run a marathon or half marathon at a specified date. Have a successful marathon training schedule to follow, even better convince a friend to join you. Share the news with everyone. There is simply no looking back! The secret is training for your 1st marathon with the “running easy”, “without a watch” running philosophy. It’s what’s helped us complete many marathons and ultra marathons with a smile.

Why I support running a marathon and not simply going to gym.
There’s nothing quite like fresh air to boost your zest for life. It’s cheaper and more sustainable than gym contracts and you can take your training schedule with you anywhere you go in the world. Simply put on your shoes wherever you are; mountains, city or sea and head out. My husband and I have enjoyed runs in the most amazing and remote places in the world. There’s nothing quite like getting the feel of a new holiday destination than exploring it on foot.

Do it for your kids!
We need to also do it for our kids. Our kids are losing it in today’s society and by setting an example of great achievements with joy and hard work, they will want to follow your example too.

Source:Nicky Blewett

I Can Run A Marathon is a free semimonthly ezine and social network running site for aspiring “beginner” 5 mile, half marathon and full marathon runners using the “running easy” approach. You’ll get insider secrets and free running tips and advice to help you Feel Good, Lose Weight and achieve optimum health and fitness. We’ll teach you the techniques for completing your 1st 5 mile, half and full marathon with a smile, guaranteed! Subscribe at http://www.icanrunamarathon.com

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3 Breathing Techniques For More Effective Running

By Terje Brooks

One of the most essential facets of running is the right way of breathing. Running isn’t just about the thighs, legs and feet. It’s also about the lungs and the way to bring greater quantities of oxygen into the system effectively.

Your Breathing Rhythms

At times, especially in long races a runner could lose focus and is thrown out of his breathing rhythm. It may be due to the simple forgetting to focus on the inhaling and exhaling or its pattern.

One way to avoid this is to time your breathing in rhythm along with your steps. This is much like the style of the swimmers who take in air at every third stroke.

Runners that get to this state are able to keep running just like a clock, with constant tempo and a lot of efficiency. This focus on breathing can also take his / her mind off from pain or tenderness that may have developed during this period and may trigger them to quit the actual race.

Deep breath

Another method you can use while running is deep breathing. It has many advantages when correctly done.

It will help the runner to keep calm, which consequently, helps to reduce exhaustion. To be able to relax reduces the likelihood of performance decline.

Runners who cannot relax end up generating inadvertent alterations in form until they experience the resulting pain. For example clinching of fists too firmly as well as running with the shoulders too high to be efficient. This kind of bad form usually results in muscle tiredness and tenderness.

Deep breathing helps promote relaxation when running. This is accomplished by taking a larger-than-normal inhale and exhaling all the way out.

During the exhale part, you need to focus on releasing all the tension in your arms by shaking them, opening up both hands and moving your head in circles.

Breath Like Swimmers

One exercising method is to breathe a bit slower than your body needs when you are not performing. This starves your system for oxygen and causes the heart to beat quicker.

After a period, your body learns to compensate for the lack of oxygen so that when this method is not in use, your system has already been more efficient in processing the breathed air. This is proven in swimming.

Swimmers do alternate breathing that is breathing every third stroke. This permits them to breathe on different sides without taking a breath with each heart stroke.

From the beginning, their body needs more oxygen, but will become familiar with adjusting to the reduction in oxygen. Over time, your body will become more efficient in processing the limited air. Runners who also swim usually have outstanding breathing efficiency.

Terje Brooks has been writing articles online as well as off-line for many years now. Terje is not only a specialist in health and fitness, you can also take a look at his website about Women’s Golf Shoes, which contains reviews of golf shoes for women and other female golf outfits.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Terje_Brooks

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Running – The Importance of Warming Up and How to Warm Up

By Blake M Talvitz

Many runners neglect the warm up. They don’t realize the importance the warm up is for optimize performance and minimizing the risk for injury. Different levels of running require different levels of warming up. Here are some guidelines.

The easy, everyday run – This type of workout only needs a short warm up, if any. Start by walking one or two blocks. Then, ease into your workout with a slow jog that gradually increases in pace until you get up to the speed that you normally run at. It should take about a half mile to get you fully warmed up. Maybe a little longer if it is colder than normal or you are tighter than usual.

Speed training – Since you are going to push your body hard, you need a more thorough warm up. Start with a five minute walk. Then, jog at a conversational pace for fifteen to twenty minutes. By doing this you are engorging your muscles with oxygen rich blood and getting your cardiovascular system ready to clear out lactic acid efficiently. After the jog, you want to stretch for five to ten minutes. It is important that do this AFTER the jog. The last thing you want to do is stretch cold muscles. This can lead to injuries.

Race day – The shorter the race, the longer you have to warm up because you need to hit top speed from the start during short races such as 5Ks. Trying to ease into top speed during the race will only lead slower race times. If you are running a 5k race, do a thirty minute jog to warm up, leaving five to ten minutes to spare before the starting gun so you can stretch. For really long races such as marathons, you can warm up for just ten minutes, leaving five to ten minutes to stretch and warm up. You can also use the first one or two miles of the race to warm up further and get a feel for the course.

Blake M Talvitz has been writing articles for 5 years, covering a number of topics such as health, fitness, home and garden, and business management. Her latest blogs are about name badge ribbons and garden swing cushions.

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25 Running Tips

This article was posted on Maxim UK, it was an old article dating back from 2005 but the tips are not outdated.

25 running tips
Whatever your running ability, there’s something here for you
Text: Tarquin Cooper

If your arms go forward, your knees will go forward – that’s how our bodies are made

Whether you’re a trembly-kneed beginner or a foot-sore veteran, it’s never too late to learn more about the world’s oldest form of fitness.

1 Watch your footing
‘Make sure your heel strikes the ground first, rather than the ball of your foot,’ advises Sajjad Afzal, a podiatrist to UK athletes. ‘Run smoothly and rhythmically.’ If you hit the ground with the side or the ball of your foot, it will roll. This has a domino effect on the rest of the body and can cause common running injuries such as shin splints, ‘runner’s knee’ and back pain.

2 Be style conscious
See a specialist to improve your running style. It could be a coach or a podiatrist, but even a member of staff in a good running shop will be able to analyse the way you run and offer tips.

3 Get pumping
Move your arms more. ‘If your arms go forward, your knees will go forward – that’s how our bodies are made,’ says personal trainer John Munroe. ‘If you have a bigger range of movement with your arms, your legs will have a greater movement too. And if you move your arms really quickly, your legs will move really quickly!’

4 Judge your pace
It may sound obvious but if you want to run a fast marathon or 10k race, you first have to learn how to judge your speed and maintain consistency. ‘Paula Radcliffe knows by the way her foot strikes the ground how fast she is running and will hit that mile marker at five mins 15 secs, or three to four seconds either side of that, every time,’ says Munroe. ‘Start by running three eight-minute miles in a week. The next week try to beat that. If you do this you’ll get quicker.’ Over a period of time you will learn to work out your speed.

5 Be progressive
Don’t train too hard too soon. If you do you will increase your risk of injury or plain, simple fatigue. Many newcomers give up because they’ve tried to go too far, too fast and have failed.

6 Work it!
That’s no excuse to slack. Work hard and remember that you get out of running what you put in.

7 Test yourself
Compete in races as part of a plan to gauge fitness, progression and race pace. Putting races in your calendar will also force you to train harder.

8 See the bigger picture
Don’t ignore the rest of your body. Running doesn’t just require strong legs and a good pair of lungs. To hold your body in the right running posture over the distance requires strong core stability. Do a weekly session of circuit training to make sure the whole body is getting a workout. A session should include press-ups, crunches, jump squats, burpees, reverse curls, split jumps and running on the spot with high knees.

9 Lift weights
Do resistance training, too. Machine exercises that will help your running include leg extensions, leg presses, hamstring curls, shoulder press and abduction work. Do three sets of between ten and 12 reps.

10 Shake up your training
Try Fartlek training. Developed in the 1930s, this is a less structured form of interval training, and something you can easily do while out on your runs. The idea is to run flat out, jog for a while, then sprint again. If you want something a little more structured try this programme, devised by personal coach and ex-international long jumper John Munroe. Pick two trees about 30 metres apart. Run 60 per cent of your top speed or maximum heart rate and jog back. On the second go, run at 70 per cent and jog back and then at 80 per cent and then back to 60. Do this for ten minutes.

11 Go hill running
The only way to improve your running fitness is to stress the lungs and your muscles – and there’s no better way to achieve this than on an energy-sapping hill. Run up at three-quarter pace, jog down, run up at three-quarter pace, jog down… you get the idea.

12 Be careful out there
Do everything within your power to avoid injury. Start your sessions with a light jog or a few minutes on the treadmill. Then warm up gently. Run hard during your workout and cool down fully afterwards.

13 Raise those knees
Avoid injury too by practising ‘functional mobility exercises’. Examples are high knee walking, high knee cantering and lunging. These will help your ‘running muscles’.

14 Know your heart
Work out your true maximum heart rate (MHR). The standard way to work out the rate is to subtract your age from 220 but if you’re serious about training, there’s a much better way. After a warm-up, run for three minutes as hard and as consistently as you can, then rest for two minutes, and then run again for three minutes at your max. Count your heart rate. This is your true MHR. Unless you’re a beginner and you’re still building up your fitness levels, run at between 75 and 87 per cent. ‘This will give you the greatest fitness benefits,’ says Munroe.

15 Keep a record
Be anal – start a training log, whether it’s on a notepad or a computer. It’s a good way to boost confidence because it shows a series of quantifiable gains – or it will if you’re doing everything right.

16 Join a club
There’s nothing like peer pressure or the presence of a proper coach to bring out the best in you. There are running clubs all around the country from serious athletics clubs to those designed to help people get fit for the first time such as the Cannons and Reebok Running Club (08707 582333, www.cannons.co.uk). For a list of athletics clubs and tracks visit www.runtrackdir.com.

17 Partner up
Running becomes much easier when you have a friend to spur/nag you on.

18 Stay hydrated
Drink even if you’re not thirsty. ‘The body has a poor thirst mechanism,’ says Adam Mead, senior dietician at Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospital in London. ‘When you’re thirsty it’s already too late. If there’s even a five per cent drop in hydration levels your performance will tail off.’

19 Know your fluids
Hydrate with water if your run is less than 15 miles. Use a sports drink if it’s longer. Take on fluid every 15 minutes of exercise.

20 Get snacking
Don’t run on an empty stomach. ‘About 60 to 90 minutes before a run, have a sandwich, a sports drink or a glass of milk and a muffin,’ says Mead.

21 Eat right
Base your meals around carbs such as pasta, rice and potatoes. You should aim to eat about 70 per cent carbs, 15 per cent protein and 15 per cent fat. ‘During any physical activity you use a crucial fuel called glycogen, which comes from carbohydrates. You need to make sure you’re eating sufficient amounts. You need protein to build new cells and muscle,’ adds Mead.

22 Do your sums
Be scientific about it. You should aim to eat five grammes of carbohydrate and one gramme of protein per kilo of bodyweight per day.

23 Eat as soon as you’ve run
This will aid recovery. Something like a banana is ideal because it has a high glycaemic index (GI) and will give an immediate boost of energy. For your main meal, eat carbohydrates with a low GI – those that release energy slowly – such as sweet potatoes and brown or Basmati rice.

24 Chill out in the bath
Forget having a hot soak after a run. It’s the worst thing you can do because it encourages the micro-tears in your muscles to bleed out, which increases soreness. Have an ice bath instead. It’s what most top athletes do because it helps flush lactic acid out of the muscles and boosts the immune system. Unless you have half a tonne of ice to hand, run the tub with cold water and jump in for about five minutes.

25 Take a multivitamin…
Athletes require more minerals and vitamins than the average person thanks to the stresses of running. Each stride can cause tiny amounts of damage to the red blood cells in the feet, and running also produces damaging free radicals. Vitamins and minerals can help mop them up.

Thanks to:
Run & Become, 020 7222 1314.